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20121225
20121225
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
, a netherlands based company, no in the medical business but in the energy business. explain why you like this multinational. >> yes, tom, sound like it belongs in the medical business, but actually no it's really a science business. core labs, about a $5 billion company and they specialize in helping oil companies find more oil and more gas that benefits all around the world. so they have scientists who actually take samples of rock and water, analyze that and try to help oil companies find more oil that may be hidden or tucked away so we can abscess more oil, which is good for all of us. >> tom: we're talking about an energy boon in the united states, energy prices, that's helped keep a cap on energy prices here. what kind of holding time frame do you anticipate to make some money? >> as we've seen this year, one reason why core labs is attractive from a valuation perfect suspective we've seen the stock soften this year as some of the rig counts have softened as well because of the i prices of natural gas have really fallen. and i do think this will reverse sometime over the next few ye
. what were you thinking? >> i believed that human beings have what i call discretionary energy that they can give you or not, and i don't think they will give it to you if they don't feel that they're treating with dignity and respect every day. if people can say i'm treated with dignity and respect, a down payment on that is nobody ever gets hurt here because we care about our own commitment to our safety and we care about the people we work with, and it swells up into everything you do so it creates a sense of pride about the organization you're involved in. >> and then you start asking them for increased productivity and increased -- >> they give it to you. you don't actually have to ask for it. you need to turn them loose. >> describe how alcoa did over the course of your tenure. >> well, we went from 1.86 for 100 workers per year having an injury that caused them to miss a lost work day. we got to 0.13. to give you a reference point, the number in health medical care institution in the united states is 5. >> and now describe what happened to alcoa commercially, financially
. >> there's weirdly a lot of energy in athens, and, whether it's good or bad, there's a feeling. >> brown: what kind of energy? >> maybe there's a "there's nothing left to lose" as a kind of freedom as well. people are going out to plays. they're still going out and doing things, but, you know with less money. but there's an urgency. poetry meetings are very well attended. literary events are packed. >> brown: why do you think that is? >> well, it's inexpensive, inexpensive entertainment. ( laughs ) but i think people want to be together. they want to be talking to people. >> brown: the crisis around here, she says, rarely makes it into her poetry in an explicit way. but she did have one direct hit for us, a playful work-in- progress called "austerity measures." >> i love the term "austerity measures." it sounds so poetic. >> brown: even though it's so real, nitty-gritty in what's happening here? >> yes, i love the idea of "measures" as, you know, verse. it was prompted by a headline that i read somewhere, which was "greece downgraded deeper into junk," the greek bonds. and it scanned nic
calls of what mht be dangerous because he spent more energy and time thinking about it, you're out of the gene pool. that trait is out we would have adopted shortening fax, emotional filters with how scary they are. and we are still in that animal. we pride ourselves with the intellect and statistics and rationale. the brain is only organ for which we think. most of it happens below the radar. john: i read the research what kills people, fearing terrorism, 300 deaths, but in the 20,000 deaths from falling. crossing streets 5,000, fires 4,000, choking on small objects 3,000, bikes 600 could drowning in a bath tub 300. statistically more likely to kill you know that a terrorist. >> it is wonderful we're having there conversation. make decisions for ourselves, which may feel right but which put us at greater risk. we need to recognize that our risk perception is subjective and formed by feelings as well as just those statistics, and recognize there is a danger in, that this phenomenon of a perception gap is in itself danger we can study, know why it happens, we can use that informatio
, a very lrong piece of energy diving south with the jet stream. we'll have a southwesterly wind flow and that twisting and hurning in the atmosphere is theably going to start turning obably gthese thunderstorms, we may see numerous tornados and some could be strong tomorrow. may >> glor: what's the latest on ate snow moving west-to-east? >> that's the big story on the st-to-ea side of the system. igoks as though we'll see a very ughe swath of heavy snowfall. that will be good news on wiristmas day for folks expecting a white christmas in little rock and oklahoma city expectin is going to turn into a travel nightmare as the system ikes its way up through the hrough tley into the great lakes and interior portions of the reat east. the places will see one to two feet of snow. specially upstate new york and especial pennsylvania. >> glor: jeff berardelli, thank you. the bad weather made things more yo difficult for last-minute madeers. peonsumer reports" estimates 17 million of them went to stores ooday. will they help retailers make up e upa lackluster season? here's john blackstone. >>
cue of man nearly washed away by the rain-swollen river. >> he had no energy left. >> jack klugman has passed away. he is best known for playing "the odd couple." >> chuck pagano returned to his team as he continues to battle leukemia. >> i asked bruce to take over. you had to win nine games? >> all that matters. >> first lady michelle obama answers calls on the santa tracking program. >> on the third day of christmas -- >> my true love gave to me. >> that stupid hat. >>> merry christmas and welcome to >>> merry christmas, welcome to "cbs this morning." merry christmas to you and you. >> our first christmas together. >> our first christmas together. yeah. great place to be. looking forward to a healthy and happy new year as well. >> so am i. santa was good to you? >> well, i'm going to see when i get home. he wasn't there when i left. since we get here so early, i'll check in when i get home. >> exactly. all right. >>> before we get started though, let's go to rebecca jarvis for a quick check of the headlines. >> thanks i'm rebecca jarvis. from the midwest to th
recording my debut album. how you ask? with 5-hour energy. i get hours of energy now -- no crash later. wait to see the next five hours. >> quick headlines for you. a new york newspaper drawing outrage for publishing the and address of people with gun permit. hundreds of people were shocked when they were lifted by the journal news. it should be done for sex offenders and not law-abiding owners. you thought the christmas deals are good. wait until tomorrow. discounts will be deeper as retailers try to get rid of the items left on the shelves. some believe it will be splashed 80 percent. >> welcome back. you know our next four legged friend well he was three months old and he was found on the side of the rod after brutally tossed out of a moving vehicle. he is full of life and more importantly a new home for christmas. joining us is joyy's mom and joyy the dog himself. nice to see you this morning. >> we saw that many people know joyy and certain low have seen him on the area. a lot of folks don't know his story and can you take us back to the beginning and how the story untolded. >> joyy was
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)